Using Social Graphs to Visualize Political Factions

21 06 2010

A couple great articles from O’Reilly on using social graphs to visualize data.  Andrew Odewahn revisits and older project in  Visualizing the Senate social graph, revisited – OReilly Radar.  The basic notion is to go through senate voting sessions with each senator as a node.  When there is a pattern of frequently having similar votes a node is drawn.  He does this over an number of different periods giving insight into the political climate.  Definetly watch the video.

Then he goes into how to improve upon the effort.  The second post shows how to code this using Processing for a more interactive social graph analysis.

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Mapping TIGER Stimulus Grants with Simile

19 02 2010

Today the U.S. Department of Transportation announced the cities that would be awarded with Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) Grants.  This seemed like a great opportunity to apply some visualization tools to a new data set.  The data was manually pulled out of the official PDF announcing the TIGER Grants and put into a Google Spreadsheet.  Then it was quick to together a SIMILE Exhibit that pointed to the data.

You can find the resulting map and table at Blldzr.

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I create a similar TIGER map using Tableau Public.

http://public.tableausoftware.com/views/TIGER_Grants_by_www_blldzr_com/Sheet1?:embed=yes&:toolbar=yes

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Blldzr: What are they Building?

16 01 2010

I have written before about the power of applying mash-up and web 2.0 technologies to government data.  For me there was a bit of put up or shut-up to the whole effort as well.  What could I do to make my community better using my development, analytical and visualization knowledge.  I wanted to find something that I had an interest around and was relevant to my community (Tucson, AZ).

Blldzr

What I came up with was Blldzr.com (pronounced Bull-Dozer).  Blldzr is a wiki that allows members of a community to enter information about development and construction projects in their area.  In a addition to the factual information there are also comments to express opinions about the developments.

Blldzr:  Answering the Question... What are they building?

After being added each development has a page that can be updated and subscribed to.

Blldzr:  A page for each development

Being informed and having conversations about what is being built in your neighborhood is one way to create community.  My hope is that Blldzr can foster more of that.

There is still much to do.  The site needs content, activity, moderators and to be promoted.  If you are interested in any or all of this feel free to pitch in (e.g. add some entries for you city).  If you would just like to be kept up to date on progress feel free to follow Blldzr on Twitter.

I will post more in the future on progress and the technology that was used in building the site.

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Data Activism: Geeks for Good

21 12 2009

Data Activism is a new an emerging trend with designers, developers and artist utilizing technology to help society understand and address the issues of our times.

The new U.S. Administration has established initiatives to make government data available to the public.  This is converging with the growing number of developers and designers that are familiar with mash-up’s and data visualization technologies.  The convergence of these trends create the ability for developers, designers and artist to create apps, sites and art that educate and provide transparency to the government.

Creating Government Transparency

The Open Government Directive is a memo sent by the White House on December 8th, 2009 directs federal agencies to:

  1. Publish Government Information Online
  2. Improve the Quality of Government Information
  3. Create and Institutionalize a Culture of Open Government
  4. Create an Enabling Policy Framework for Open Government

Each of these are follow with specific actions that must start to show results in the next couple of months.  The main hub for this information will be Data.gov, providing Federal data sets, and links to State and local efforts as well.
Data.gov Screenshot
This is amazing progress for the government that will bring both innovation and efficiency.  Possibilities will be opened up as great designers get creative on representing the governments data.  The government agencies will be pressured to improve as their performance becomes public knowledge.  All of this is a win for Americans with more services, useful information and government efficiency.

Everyone can participate by using the data, giving feedback, building visualizations, building reports, etc.  You can get involved by yourself, or join a team of like minded individuals.  What are you waiting for?

Resources:

Examples:

If you have other resources or examples you recommend, add them as comments and I will update this article.

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